Zoom into Speaking Made Easy

Zoom into Speaking Made Easy

Zoom into Speaking Made Easy online Group. Develop confidence in today's modern world. Practise your speaking and presentation skills in a safe, supportive friendly environment. No longer do you need to be stopped by state borders, distance, location or time but can achieve it from the comfort of your own space. Our online group is a national community of women practising skills for home, study, work, community or social situations.
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Supporters

Supporting women in developing their confidence

The following organisations, businesses, and councils are valuable supporters of Speaking Made Easy at Group, Regional, and National level, providing rooms for women to meet and develop their confidence.
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Tas Meetings

What's Happening @ Speaking Made Easy Meetings in Tasmania

Speaking Made Easy meetings. Come along! Attend a group meeting, they are not to be missed, being a part of these meetings give you the Speaking skills to develop and bring out the speaker within you. Attend as an observer to get an insight to what Speaking Made Easy is all about.
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Vic Meetings

What's happening @ Speaking Made Easy Meetings in Victoria

Speaking Made Easy meetings. Come along! Attend a group meeting, they are not to be missed, being a part of these meetings give you the Speaking skills to develop and bring out the speaker within you. Attend as an observer to get an insight to what Speaking Made Easy is all about.
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SA Meetings

What's happening @ Speaking Made Easy Meetings in SA

Speaking Made Easy meetings. Come along! Attend a group meeting, they are not to be missed, being a part of these meetings give you the Speaking skills to develop and bring out the speaker within you. Attend as an observer to get an insight to what Speaking Made Easy is all about.
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The Art of Conversation

Art of Conversation, Talking

The Art of Conversation

Anyone who thinks the art of conversation is dead ought to tell a child to go to bed.   Robert C. GallagherHow true is this quote! Many children engage in a continuous conversation when it is bed time, in an attempt to not go to bed.Do you know someone who reels out a monologue to their listeners, and doesn’t realise a conversation requires dialogue? A garrulous person doesn’t just like to talk, they indulge in talking for talking’s sake. Some people cannot keep quiet and others remain silent. On the other hand, we all know someone who has the knack for good conversation. They have a manner which can set a stranger at ease.There are some guidelines or reminders for engaging in conversation. The obvious ones include being attentive, actively listening, having some talking topics ready, tailoring your contribution to your listener, taking your turn to speak and thinking before you speak. However, there are some other tools you can use to have an effective conversation and one that maximises the contribution and enjoyment by anyone present.
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How’s Your Day Going?

Talking, Conversing

How's Your Day Going?

Some people say conversation is a dying art as we spend so much time looking at screens and because the growth of social media is about broadcasting ‘me, me, me’.Conversation is simply talking to someone, usually informally. It should be enjoyable and fulfilling. Do you want to remove shyness and be the charming authentic you?  You can. Conversation skills can be learnt.Conversation is the balance between listening and talking for all those participating. It is not a conversation if one person is hogging all the time with their monologue. Practise the following skills and seriously consider the additional tips to improve your conversations.
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Building Rapport

Building Rapport

Building Rapport

Have you ever known people who immediately connect with others?  It doesn’t matter who they meet, they create mutual understanding and trust. These people seem to have a natural ability. However, anyone can learn the skills of rapport and nurture them.What is rapport?It is the establishment of two-way connections by forming a meaningful harmonious relationship between people based on mutual understanding of trust and agreement. It basically is an emotional connection with other people.It is usually based on shared experiences, points of view and shared humour.Everyone can benefit from having rapport with others. Whether with colleagues, friends, families, within the community or as a customer, building rapport is important in our personal lives.When you first meet someone new, you start to build rapport. Small talk will help you find things in common and build a shared bond. It is much easier to build rapport with someone who is very like you, or who shares common interests.Employers are more likely to employ someone whom they think will fit in well with their other staff. Personal relationships are easier to make and develop when there is a close connection between people.
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Speaking Confidently

Saying it with confidence

Speaking Confidently

How can you speak confidently?Speaking confidently can be achieved by using techniques which create a dynamic message. However, the most important thing to remember is to fully know and understand what you are saying, and why you are saying it. A monotone delivery, low energy, speaking softly and mumbling are not enjoyed by anyone. Your voice has the power to completely change what others think of you. You can choose to be the authentic you. In 2009 when Susan Boyle performed on Britain’s Got Talent, she surpassed preconceived notions of what a good singer is supposed to look like. Her voice created a personal brand that has become well-known. This is the fourth in a series of 2020 blogs on confidence. The main techniques when using your voice are speech clarity, creating word pictures, voice projection, pace, pitch, pausing and inflection. When public speaking, to one or two people, or to a larger audience, the same techniques can be used.
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Building Confidence for Public Speaking

Building confidence in public speaking nervousness

Building Confidence for Public Speaking

This is the third 2020 blog on building confidence. The February blog was titled How to Appear Confident and the March blog, The Importance of Saying Your Name Confidently.Do you feel nervous when presenting in public? We can all feel this, however, a little nervous tension can enhance your performance.  Yet, on the other hand, too much nervousness can spoil a performance.Nervousness is a result of fear – fear of failure, shyness, making an error, memory lapse, looking incompetent or foolish.  Sometimes the audience doesn’t know how you are feeling. Other times the audience will know you are nervous because of your physical symptoms such a ‘red neck flush’, breathlessness or sweating. Behaviour can also be a clue that you have nervous tension. Looking at the ceiling or floor, speaking too fast and looking uncomfortable at the lectern are recognisable by an audience.There are several strategies to reduce your nervousness and develop your confidence. Continue reading for more important strategies.
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